Academics
Course
Text size 글자작게 글자크게 출력하기
Course Descriptions
The list of courses and corresponding credit hours that appear below is not exhaustive and is subject to change. Sufficient notice will be given to students of any such modifications.
Click 'Dropdowns' for more information
School of Law
Survey of American Law
(Spring&Fall)
This is an introductory law course designed for those with little to no knowledge of US law or its legal system. We will explore a broad range of topics to include the following: 1) Background of US Law, 2) the US Federal and State Court Systems, 3) The US Civil Litigation Process, 4) The US Criminal Trial Process, and 5) Ethics and the Legal Professional. Throughout the course, we will be referring to Scripture to add to our understanding.

 

Legal Research and Writing
(Spring&Fall)
The student will receive a rigorous introduction to legal reasoning, legal writing and research, and methods of interpreting the law. Several writing assignments will help the student hone their analytical skills and practice the fundamentals of drafting clear and concise answers to legal questions.
 
Liberty·Justice·Peace·Law 1
(Spring)
This course called "Liberty-Justice-Peace-Law" has probably the best course name in all of Handong and one that would interest many in society. However, if you ask 100 people to define "liberty" you may receive 100 different answers. Same would go for the other remaining terms of justice, peace, and law. In this course, we will explore how society (you and me) defines such lofty terms and contrast it to how God, through His Scripture, sees them.
 
US Constitutional Law
(Spring)
This course will introduce students to a foundation in constitutional law applicable in the United States. Students will learn three main topics of the U.S. Constitution: Separation of Powers, Federalism, and Protection of Individual Rights. Students will also be familiar with the major theories and cases of the United States Constitution through this class.

 

US Criminal Law and Procedure
(Spring)
In U.S. Criminal Law, a distinction is made between the law's substance and procedure of the justice system. Substantive law defines rights and obligations. Procedural law establishes the methods used to enforce legal rights and obligations. In this course, we will explore what constitutes a crime and how that crime is handled/processed within the U.S. justice system.
US Torts
(Spring)
The Law of Torts is probably one of the most litigated areas of law in America and perhaps the world. In this course, we will explore what a tort is, the different types of torts, tort damages, and legally recognized tort excuses/defenses. We will also consider how tort law relates and differs to criminal and contract law.
 
U.S. and International Business Law
(Spring)
This course offers legal and business frameworks for entrepreneurs. This course will follow a storyline that an entrepreneur emigrates to U.S. and encounters various legal problems and eventually goes public. With this transitional approach, this course examines legal issues at each stage including immigration status, business formation, raising money, contracts, venture capital, intellectual property, licensing, and going public. If there are students who are considering to start a business in U.S., they can find practical tips from this course. (Students will try to solve problems together with professor and TA in the class, and thus students will use most of their time in the class practicing how to find solution.)

 

International Economic Law
(Spring)
In this course, we will explore the laws, policies and institutions that guide and govern trade among nations. In particular, we will focus much of our attention on how institutions like the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization (WTO), has influenced international trade and the world economy.

 

International Human Rights Law
(Spring)
  • - The second half of the last century saw the impact of globalization, dramatic advancements in technological innovation, the spread of democracy, and increased privatization. As these forces continue to affect the international system today, traditional conceptions of international law with its foundational principle of state sovereignty are outwardly being challenged. In step with this phenomenon, the international human rights movement has steadily gained momentum since the end of World War II to its place today in the mainstream discourse of international law.
  • - This course will introduce students not only to the content of international human rights law and the institutions that seek to enforce them, but also to the bigger picture of the tension that exists between long standing assumptions about international law and the new realities created by the international human rights movement. The course will hopefully give students an opportunity to make a critical appraisal of the international human rights system from a Christian worldview.

 

Intellectual Property Law
(Spring)
  • - Introduction to intellectual property law
  • - Familiarization with basic concepts and application of copyright, trademark, and patent law
  • - Case reading and analysis
  • - Discussion on current issues regarding IP laws and law and technologies in general

 

Korean Law & Legal System
(Spring)
This course aims to overview Korean law and legal system and understand its unique characteristics from the perspective of 'law and development'. Firstly, we are going to take a survey of a few important Korean laws through lecturing: constitutional law, administrative law, civil law (including family law), criminal law, commercial law. Then, taking a step forward, we will examine several issues which would show us very unique features of Korean law especially from the historical perspective.
During the course, students are supposed to make presentations to summarize articles chosen by themselves in advance and give short comments on them. Each group is comprised of 2 students (exceptionally 3) and is expected to present once in this semester. We don't have midterm exam. Finally, at the end of this semester, students are required to answer to questions regarding basic knowledge about Korean Law, and submit a final essay individually, which is the most important factor in grading. The topic of essay is to be freely chosen among various current and past issues in Korean law. But it is expected to be creative and insightful.

 

Justice: Readings in Moral & Political Philosophy
(Spring)
This seminar course provides students of law with an opportunity, first, to get acquainted with select works by classical and contemporary writers that represent major schools of thought in Western moral and political philosophy, and second, through close reading of and critical reflection on these works of enduring influence, to deepen their understanding as they prepare to engage in the public forum with a number of moral, legal, and political issues. Helping students develop and articulate their own perspectives, especially as Christian members of their body politic, is the ultimate objective of this course. There will be short weekly writing assignments and a term paper in lieu of final exam. Cross-listed in the undergraduate UIL program and the international law school J.D.-equivalent program.
Legal Negotiation
(Spring)
Negotiation is a basic, special form of human communication and is considered as one of the most crucial lawyering skills. This course will expose students to a comprehensive and practical approach to negotiation and is designed to instill basic professional competency into students so that one can become an effective negotiator in an international context.

 

Constitutional Democracy in Comparative Perspective
(Spring *Odd years 1)
Course will review "How should we then live?: The Rise and decline of Western thought and culture" by Francis A Schaeffer. The course is designed to build a legal mind in western and comparative context. The course intends to develop intellectual capacity to address today's challenges and issues in context of biblical perspective.

 

Liberty·Justice·Peace·Law 2
(Fall)
This course called "Liberty-Justice-Peace-Law" has probably the best course name in all of Handong and one that would interest many in society. However, if you ask 100 people to define "liberty" you may receive 100 different answers. Same would go for the other remaining terms of justice, peace, and law. In this course, we will explore how society (you and me) defines such lofty terms and contrast it to how God, through His Scripture, sees them.
 
Legal Argumentation
(Fall)
This course is an introduction to the art of argument and persuasion. We will examine the varied components of a legal argument, both the theoretical and practical. Students will partake in argument reconstruction and deconstruction, and learn to spot ineffective and more importantly, effective uses of argumentative tools. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to students making oral arguments either in a group or adversarial setting. Each student will be given several opportunities to present and receive appropriate feedback. The course’s objective is for the student to (a) understand general legal reasoning; (b) formulate sound legal arguments; and (c) develop a more persuasive discourse.
*While not strictly required, Legal Research & Writing should be taken prior to registering for Legal Argumentation

 

International Child Law and Development
(Fall)
Child is one of the most important topics in Human Rights and International Development. This course will examine the pursuit of happiness in the context of childhood and children's rights from a comparative perspective. The course will review international human rights instruments and treaties, international and national human rights mechanism in a comparative context. The student will understand the best interest of the child and its relation to national and international protection and constitutional rights. Students will be exposed to issues dealing with children such as Child Labour, Children with Disability, Street Children, Juvenile Justice and Children and Health, and education. At the end of the course, students will understand international children's law mechanism, sustainable development for children, and rights of the family.

 

US Contracts
(Fall)
This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the fundamental concepts and sources of contract law. This course evaluates the core components of a legally binding agreement or promise and examines issues that affect such enforceable agreements. Students will get a chance to study what constitutes as a breach of contract and the damages available.

 

American Legal Theory
(Fall)
In this course we will critically examine through American court decisions different theories of equality, liberty/freedom, and personal autonomy themes so central to any system of law. We will also get to study along the way how the courts in America see their role in resolving controversial issues of fundamental importance and what methods of interpretation they adopt accordingly. What theories are chosen by the courts both theories of substantive issues and theories of adjudication - would have far-reaching effects on people and society. Through close analysis of select judicial decisions, this course intends to advance understanding on some of the theoretical underpinnings of adjudication process in America and their implications for American society in general. Students will in the end be pressed to develop their reasoned views on questions of enormous significance: what should be the meaning of liberty, equality, personal autonomy or human dignity in a political community, and what should be the courts’ role in resolving issues related to these central themes in law.
 
Public International Law
(Fall)
  • - The second half of the last century saw the impact of globalization, dramatic advancements in technological innovation, the spread of democracy and increased privatization. As these forces continue to affect the international system today, traditional conceptions of international law with its foundational principle of state sovereignty are outwardly being challenged and transformed. In step with this phenomenon, the impact of international law has steadily gained momentum since the end of World War II to its place today in the mainstream discourse of law and legal studies.
  • - This course will introduce students not only to the content and processes of public international law and the institutions that seek to enforce and shape them, but also to the bigger picture of the tension that exists between long standing assumptions about international law and the realities of globalization. Ultimately, the course will hopefully give students an opportunity to make a critical appraisal of the international legal system from a Christian worldview.

 

Comparative Legal Systems
(Fall)
This course offers students an introduction to legal comparison from the dual perspective of U.S. and Chinese (PRC) law. This course also covers Islamic and Hindu legal systems briefly. Students taking this course will already have had some exposure to the American legal system but will likely be less familiar with its Chinese counterpart and other legal systems. In particular, Chinese legal system is a socialist system of law based primarily on the civil law model. This course mainly focuses on the significant distinctions between U.S. and Chinese legal systems with respect to different areas of the law and to help students develop an analytic framework with which they can compare and contrast other legal systems.
Law & Development
(Fall)
This course is to begin with understanding why we study law and development. Namely, why are we, as law students, talking about 'Development'? It has not been very long since western scholars had interests in development of a country as a whole especially in connection with law. However, they have come to recognize that law has something to do with development, and start to examine their relevance. The practical implication of this study is that we would be able to do something with laws to promote development of a country. In a sense, we are looking for a recipe for development. Although this attempt to find out panacea must fail, it is certain that law is one of tremendously important something in developing a county's economy, politics or society. That's the reason why we should think about law again in the context of development. Surely, we will study law and development of Korea, but much of our attention is directed toward current developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America.
Law and Contemporary Issues
(Fall)
Just in the past decade alone, there has been an explosion of issues that has given rise to many disputes, divisions, and conflicts in society. Many of these issues greatly impact our everyday life and the laws that we live under. In this course, we will explore some of these contemporary issues and the laws that govern them. Students will be required to lead at least two classes (or more depending on the number of enrolled students) on topics related to this course title. Such topics may include the current controversies surrounding the definition of marriage, climate change and the environment, terrorism and security issues, human trafficking and exploitation, the death penalty, among others. The students will have the autonomy to determine the depth, detail and the format of these lectures. Scoring of these lectures/presentations will be done by both the course professor and individual students.

 

Special Topics in UIL
(Fall)
Patent Law
Intellectual Property (IP) becomes the 21st century’s most compelling legal domain. After Samsung vs. Apple case, the importance of intellectual property rights, in particular patent rights, becomes well known to public. Patent law is designed to encourage the creation and disclosure of a wide variety of intellectual goods in exchange of exclusive rights for a limited period of time. In this competitive market, patent protection is used as a sword and a shield for technology companies. Patent law knowledge is critical for all tech-based entrepreneurs, engineers, lawyers, and company managers as it is an inevitable component for the business strategies. I am a US patent attorney majored in mechanical engineering and US law, and have plenty experiences assisting clients in a range of a start-up to major companies on a daily basis more than ten years. Further, I have hands-on patent experiences in Korea, China and United States. This class is designed to share my practical experience and equip students to grasp the basic concepts of patent law and to use the knowledge in the field. This course will examine the fundamentals of patent law. We will look at what types of inventions or discoveries fall within the scope of patent law protection, overview of the patent prosecution process, enforcement of the patent rights, and global patent strategies. Although patent cases often involve complicated technologies, this course would not require any understanding the underlying technology. Thus, students with non-technical backgrounds are encouraged to take this course. Intellectual property rights are increasingly important to commercial clients over the world and thus students with law degree or business management would find the benefits of understanding patent law system and strategies from this class. Of course, students with engineering backgrounds and without law degree are welcomed to take this class as well. All engineers and technology-based entrepreneurs are required to understand the basic concepts of patent law to protect their novel ideas in a proper manner. No prior legal knowledge is required to take this class.
 
Lawyers in Society
(Fall *Even years 2)
Being a Christain lawyer is possible, but not easy. We will learn, first, the US Judicial Process and how it affects the citizen's lives. Next, we will read and talk on the topic of the role of the lawyers in society and being a lawyer as a Christian.
 
Advanced International Law
(Unconfirmed)
This is a seminar class, meaning we will examine various topics involving International Law. Specifically, we will explore two areas of interest in the international context: (a) international trade and commerce (including dispute resolution) and (b) international human rights as applied to sexual ethics, and particularly homosexuality.

 

Handong Global University 558 Handong-ro Buk-gu, Pohang Gyeongbuk 37554 Republic of Korea
Copyright (c)Handong Global University. All Rights Reserved.